What is EFT?

EFT, also known as tapping or psychological acupressure, It involves tapping specific points on the body, primarily on the head and the face, in a particular sequence. While doing this, the person focuses on the issue that they wish to treat. According to EFT International, the technique can be helpful for people with:

 Anxiety

• Depression

• Chronic Pain

• Stress

• Weight Loss Issues

• Other Problems

How does it work?

As with acupuncture and acupressure, tapping involves the body’s energy meridian points, which are a concept in Chinese medicine. Proponents believe them to be areas of the body through which energy flows.

 

In this theory, blocks or imbalances in the flow of energy lead to ill health. According to EFT advocates, tapping on these meridian points with the fingertips restores the balance of energy to resolve physical and emotional issues.

 

It can also work in a similar way to mindfulness, as it can draw a person’s attention to their body and breathing. It may serve as a mental distraction from the issues that are causing anxiety or stress.

 

More recently, a 2019 study Trusted Source involving 203 individuals tested the physical reactions and psychological symptoms of people attending EFT workshops. The researchers reported that participants experienced significant reductions in anxiety, depression, and PTSD symptoms, as well as in pain levels and cravings. They also reported improvements in happiness. Physical measures in a subset of participants showed improvements in heart rate, blood pressure, and levels of the stress hormone cortisol.

 

In other research, students with anxiety reported that EFT helped them feel calmer and more relaxed

EFT for Depression

In addition to the studies that evaluate EFT on people with both anxiety and depression, other research focuses on EFT for those with depression alone. A 2012 study involving 30 students with moderate-tosevere depression reported that those who received four group sessions of EFT treatment had significantly less depression than those in the control group, who received no treatment.

According to the researchers, these findings indicated that EFT might be useful as a brief, cost effective, and successful treatment. A 2016 review Trusted Source of 20 studies reported that EFT was highly effective in reducing the symptoms of depression. The findings suggested that EFT was equal to or better than other standard treatments for depression.

In a 2013 study, 30 veterans who received EFT treatment along with standard care had significantly less psychological distress and PTSD symptoms than those who were on a waiting list for treatment. In addition, after three and six sessions, 60.0% and 85.7% of these participants respectively no longer met the PTSD clinical criteria. At 6 months after the treatment, 79.5% of participants did not fit the criteria, which the researchers said indicated the long term benefits of EFT.

In a 2017 survey, Trusted Source of EFT practitioners, most (63%) reported that EFT could resolve even complex PTSD in 10 sessions or fewer. Almost 90% of respondents stated that less than 10% of their clients make little or no progress. However, it is important to note that these findings are self-reported by people who practice EFT. In addition, practitioners often combine EFT with other approaches, including cognitive therapy, which may play a role in the treatment’s success.